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Propylene-Ethylene Glycol

Propylene glycol is a small organic alcohol commonly used as a skin conditioning agent. It has been associated with irritant and allergic contact dermatitis as well as contact urticaria in humans. Contraindications include:

Eye: Causes mild eye irritation. Contact may cause irritation, tearing, and burning pain.

Skin: Causes moderate skin irritation. Contact with the skin may cause erythema, dryness, and defatting.

Ingestion: May cause gastrointestinal irritation with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Low hazard for usual industrial handling. May cause hemoglobinuric nephrosis. May cause changes in surface EEG.

Inhalation: Low hazard for usual industrial handling. May cause respiratory tract irritation.

Chronic: May cause reproductive and fetal effects. Laboratory experiments have resulted in mutagenic effects. Exposure to large doses may cause central nervous system depression. Chronic ingestion may cause lactic acidosis and possible seizures.

Ethylene glycol is a colorless, odorless liquid. It can exist in the air in vapor form. It is used frequently in cosmetics as a solvent and softening agent. Exposure to low amounts of ethylene glycol can cause irritation to the skin, eyes, nose, and throat.
SOURCES:

National Toxicology Program. (2010, October). CAS Registry Number: 122-99-6 Toxicity Effects (Ethylene glycol monophenyl ether). National Library of Medicine’s Hazardous Substance Database. Retrieved from http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/index.cfm?objectid=E87CEA94-BDB5-82F8-FC5D16AB6E577B0B

National Toxicology Program. (2012, March). Propylene glycol mono-t-butyl ether. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Retrieved from http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/?objectid=BD983802-123F-7908-7B26F18D6255FAD8

Tox Town. (2012, March). Ethylene Glycol. U.S. National Library of Medicine. Retrieved from http://toxtown.nlm.nih.gov/text_version/chemicals.php?id=13